Easy Camp Huntsville 500 Tent

CAMP DOWN THE RABBIT HOLE

I have not received compensation in any way for the video or this blog post.  I put this up because I could not find a non company post or video about this model of tent.  I want to provide useful information for those considering buying one.

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Another addition to Camp Down the Rabbit Hole is the Easy Camp Huntsville 500 5 Person Tunnel Tent.  It’s a 10′ x 15 1/2′ tunnel tent.  The tent comes in three pieces, the outer part of the tent, considered the rainfly, the floor and the interior enclosed room.  The rainfly is made from 190T 100% coated polyester with taped seams, the enclosed room from 100% uncoated polyester, the floor is 100% polyethylene.

There are five windows, two doors and vents.  The main door has two zippers with Velcro tabs to attach the bottom to the rainfly and a double zipper screen panel.  Both parts can be rolled up to the top of the entry and be held in place with toggles and loops.  There are two grommets on each corner of the door so that it can be held open with poles to act as a shade over the screened area.  On either side are small mesh screen vents that are held open with foam and fabric arms.  The side door also has a two zipper closing system where the bathtub floor can fold out flat.  There is no mesh screen.  The back or rear of the tent has a screened window that zips closed from the outside.

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Main entry, ventilation sleeves, vinyl window

Four of the windows are vinyl with no screen or way to open them.  Fabric covers for privacy can be opened or closed by separating them from the Velcro tabs.  The interior room insert is meant to create a separate room in the back section of the tent.  It is held in place with toggles attached to rings with elastic.  While it can offer privacy and an alternate to the open floor plan I don’t like it much.  It is not snug fitting to the sides of the rainfly.  When put in place there is about 6″ of space on the sides, top and back.  That is a lot of space lost.  Sometime in the future I may disassemble it so that only the door side attaches to the tent.  Then it would be useful.

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Main entry open, view to back of tent, ventilation vents

LS AID STATION

There are several reasons I choose this tent.  My main reason was to set it up as our heated or air conditioned in camp aid station.  There is enough space for two cots or stretchers on saw horses, medical supplies and equipment.  The side door floor folds out flat so that if hard plastic or plywood flooring was added a gurney could be wheeled in instead of carried.  And, it makes it easier to hand carry without having to step over the fabric threshold of the main door.  The vinyl windows don’t open making it easier to heat and cool without modifying them.

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View of interior room insert

I have changed a some things and added a few.   Two 8″ ventilation hose sleeves were added to facilitate use of a heater or air conditioner.  Velcro was sewn across the bottom of the rear window closure to reduce air exchange.  I sewed the floor onto the rainfly walls to keep the insects and unwanted wildlife out.  Velcro was also placed at the bottom of the side door.  The retaining straps that ran across the floor to hold the sides in place were removed so that the floor could expand and pull tight.  They had been placed there to prevent the sides from splaying before the floor was sewn in.  The tent seals up good.

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View of side door with floor folded down

Set up is easy enough that one person can do it in about 30 to 35 minutes.  There are 14 stakes for the tent and 14 for the guy lines.  I’ve had the most success setting it up by my self by laying the tent out so the footprint is mostly in place, staking the back corners down, then staking the front entrance center guy line.  Once those are in place the three fiberglass color coded poles are pushed though the sleeve then the ends are put over the metal pins connected to the tent body.  Moving from back to front the tent will begin to stand up and stay in place.

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Front entrance, taper is visible

Next the tent body stakes are placed.  To keep the tent in line stake and connect one side then move to the other.  Note the front entrance corners are tapered from the place where the poles connect making it a little difficult to line up without them shifted to one side or another.  I leave the front for last.  It seems easier to line the front up with the sides.  Although this tent is not heavy duty it will work well for the occasional use.  I’m satisfied how the modifications turned out and the tent itself.  Questions and comment are always welcome.  Check out the video below.  -13

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