Booster Bath Tub and Petsafe Ramp Product Experience & Modifications

Bathing dogs is a necessity.  That doggy pond water smell isn’t welcome here, it’s too much.  It’s always been a strain on my lower back bending over to give our dog a good scrubbing.  I looked at various tubs but didn’t like them for several reasons.  Some were at ground level requiring me to bend over, while elevated tubs were fully enclosed requiring me to lift the dog over the rim.  I did find a tub that had an opening that a dog could walk into.

The Booster Bath large elevated tub is configured so that steps could be attached at the opening.  It looks good but the steps didn’t look as if it would work very well.  There were 3 steps that would be difficult for a larger dog to navigate.  My dog would jump off them.  I decided to go with a ramp that I would modify to attach to the tub.

I like the tub itself but do not like the leg design.  The way the legs are designed they want to push out and away from the tub.  The tendon part of the leg wants to come out of the slots.  The first time I used the tub my dog jumped out just as one of the legs pulled out.  I replaced the leg then continued with bathing.  My dog wants to sit down in the middle of the tub.  This pushes down making the legs move outward as I’m scrubbing the dog.

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While the dog was sitting in the tub I looked at the underside and noticed a gap at the connection point.  I thought if I don’t support the tub the legs would pull out and the tub would collapse with the dog in it.  It first I wasn’t sure what might work then remembered I had a shower chair/bench in storage.  I took off the back and arm rest adjusted the height to fit.  It worked the chair fit perfectly without interference.

tub chair

Now when the dog is washed the tub is very stable.   Our dog is relaxed, calm and seems to enjoy the bath.  I’m not the only one who has had issue with the legs.  There are many customer reviews on Amazon reporting the same problems.

To get the dog into the tub I went with the Petsafe folding ramp.  I liked that it is lightweight, folding and fits into the tub when finished.  It had a semi flat area that would allow me to attach it to the tub with clevis pins.  Drill a few holes, push the pins in and done.

clevis pin

When I used the ramp the first time as the dog reached the hinge the tub began to tilt backward from the dogs weight.  I attached the front of the tub to the ground with a strap the had the dog walk up.  The ramp was very shaky as well as flexed as the dog passed over the hinge.  It looked like there was a lot of pressure being placed over the hinge portion.  To counteract the forces I put a concrete block and some wood under the hinge.  That eliminated the flexing and made the ramp much more stable.

I knew the block and wood was temporary.  It was a hassle that looked like an eyesore.  I looked at many options and didn’t like any of them.  One day while checking out a Harbor Freight mailing it dawned on me that 3 ton jack stands might work.  I purchased a pair and they fit perfectly without any adjustments.  All I did was all some nonslip matting.  Now that ramp is very sable.

jack stands

The other issue I was having getting the dog up the ramp was that she would jump off.  I couldn’t understand why.  I thought it might be how the darker colored ramp is perceived.  Maybe it looks like the slots in a cattle guard to her.  A shadow that she can’t see well or at all.  After adding some light color towels I was able to walk her up with no problems.

Seems like the ramp does have an issue near the hinge.  After my experience I went though every one of the one star reviews at Amazon.  I noticed a pattern where the ramp broke at the hinge.  After viewing several photographs from customers it was plain to see a consistent in the breaks.  The all looked nearly identical.  I think there is a flaw in the design or plastic.

My opinion of the tub and ramp is that if I wasn’t able to add the chair and jack stands I would not use them again for fear of them collapsing.  Anyone who has either of them currently may want to look into the solutions I’ve had success with.  Anyone considering purchasing them should also factor in the additional cost of the supports.  Since I’ve had success with the solutions I’ll keep using the ramp/tub combination with confidence.  The video has all the details.  -13

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ground anchor tent stake driver socket

Note: this post contains affiliate links, proceeds support this website.

Living in Florida we’re prepared for living in tents for various reasons.  There’s camping for pleasure.  We may have to evacuate to another location for protection from a hurricane.  Most of the time we stay on the homestead when a hurricane is predicted to strike our area.  Our home could become so damaged that we may have to camp in the back yard until it is repaired.  We have soft soil, high winds and hard rain storms to content with.

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Failed tent stake experiment.

Setting up camp in sandy terrain requires the right stake.  If hard ground stakes are used they’ll pull out as soon as force is put on a tent or what ever structure needs to be anchored.  I had considered the MSR ToughStake but the cost was prohibitive since we need 35-40.  They wanted over $30.00 for two of the larger size stakes.  I tried to make something similar with what was sold as stakes that worked in the sand but it didn’t work.  If I used them they would have to be buried.  That’s more than I want to do when pitching or rolling up camp.

GROUND ANCHOR

Preferred sand stake, 3/8″ x 15″ ground anchor

I ended up getting 3/8″ x 15″ auger type ground anchors that screw into the sand.  This size is perfect for setting up the average camping tent.  I’ve used larger ones in the past to hold down sheds and temporary tarp structures.  They worked very good.  The only issue is getting them into the ground or removing them.  After watching a video on YouTube I decided to try to modify a couple of impact sockets.

BOTH SOCKETS

32mm & 27mm 1/2″ drive deep impact sockets

I wasn’t sure how the experiment was going to go so I used 20% off coupons to buy the sockets from Harbor Freight.  I decided on impact sockets that way they could be used with any manual, pneumatic, cordless or electric driver available.  First was the 32mm to see if I could do it then the 27mm.  I thought the 27 mm might work as well or better plus I’d have a back up in case one or the other was lost or damaged.

 

I used a cutting and grinding wheel on an angle grinder to remove the material creating enough space for the ground anchor eyelet to fit though.  The grinding work isn’t pretty but it works.  Now we have two sockets that will drive those ground anchors into the sand.  I ordered the ground anchors from a couple of suppliers and they each had different size eyelets.  The drivers accommodate both sizes.  Really glad that video was on YouTube.  Pitching and rolling up camp will be much easier now.

32 WITH ANCHOR

Video link is below if you want to see the how it turned out.  -13

 

Defensor Fortis LCS PALS Filler Panel

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Defensor Fortis – Load Carrying System

Once again another DF-LCS (Defensor Fortis Load Carrying System) modification.  This time it’s for the elastic that connects the rear section to the two front sections.  After using the DF-LCS I was unhappy with the unused space created by the elastic connection and wanted a solution.  I had a surplus fighting load carrier (FLC) on hand when it dawned on me to break it down into individual components and reuse the parts to fill the space.

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Elastic connector between front and rear DF-LCS sections.

The PALS (pouch attachment ladder system) panels on the FLC would be perfect with little modification necessary.  Once they were removed from the rest of the assembly it would be easy to cut the parts to size, sew on the recycled edge binding, then sew the free ends together.  This would allow them to slip over the elastic connector then be laced to the front and rear section of PALS webbing with military spec paracord.

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PALS filler panel over elastic connector, laced onto front and rear sections.

The idea works well for the ALICE M-16 pouches I converted to MOLLE.  So far those have performed as expected when the ALICE magazine pouches are fully loaded with gear.  I did have to tighten the lace up to eliminate the slight sagging issue.

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Front view ALICE magazine pouch attached to PALS panel.

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Rear view of ALICE magazine pouch and PALS panel on a DF-LCS.

I don’t have a lot of detail here because it’s in the video.  The video moves from FLC disassembly, to layout, then sewing and finally how to make it work with the LCS.  Video below.  -13

Defensor Fortis LCS Belt Keeper & Flashlight Holster PALS modifications.

Time for some gear updates.  After switching from my old favorite ALICE LBE to MOLLE DF-LCS I experienced a couple of issues.  When using the LCS it would inch it’s way over my pants belt and push down creating discomfort.  I also noticed when in a sitting, crawling or in a prone position the rig would tend to climb toward my chest.  After thinking of a solution the only one I could think of was to attach straps that would keep the LCS from moving away from my waistline.

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Right segment of DF-LCS before adding belt keepers.

The idea came from my experience wearing a duty belt with belt keepers that were designed to hold the duty belt in line with my pants belt.  With this in mind I measured the area I wanted to place the keepers, doubled the length then added a inch and a half.  The extra length would give my fingers a place to work the snaps I intended to use.  Once I had the dimensions for the strap I cut six lengths of poly webbing, folded them in half and sewed them so the two halves would work as one.

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Right segment of LCS after belt keeper straps were added.

 

After sewing the keeper straps together they were sewn onto the three segments of the LCS.  Next the holes were punched then the snaps were added.  It was an easy project taking no more than 45-60 minutes to complete.  After testing the idea seems to work well to prevent the LCS from moving around and causing me trouble.  The LCS rig still has some movement/flexibility however it won’t move away from my waistline.  I made a short video, the link is below.

 

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I also modified what was labeled as a MOLLE flashlight holster to meet PALS specifications so I could attach it to my quick response belt.  The holster had the vertical snap strap but did not have the ladder webbing.  To fix this issue I removed the belt loop strap, opened the sewn seam to join the holster, added the new ladder section, then sewed the piece back together.  Time spent was about a half hour.  I made a how-I-did-it video the link its below.  -13

Austere Medicine: Mega Medic Bag – Kit Contents

Note: this post contains affiliate links, proceeds support this website.

I finally got around to finishing this bag and making a video!  On June 3rd of 2016 I posted a product review video of the Mega Medic bag.  At the time it was sitting empty, we had decided our medical supplies and equipment needed to be changed and updated based on how the use of the kits evolved over the previous 5-8 years.  Most of the kits had been used out of a rescue truck for a project we were working on.

When I made the review video I gathered various medical items that fit into the different parts of the bag to demonstrate the possibilities of what could be kept there.  The items shown weren’t a set up ready-to-go kit.  I already had a list for the kit contents but didn’t have everything I wanted.  Some of the items on hand had reached it’s useful life.

Recently after reading a video comment on the kit I had never seen before I checked to see what was needed to finish this kit.  Triangle bandages.  That was all.  Trying to keep track of medical inventory without a computer may put me in a straight jacket.  After replacing and restocking items the kit was finally ready.  How is that for a swift kick in the pants?

BRAVO

B Compartment

The kit is an extension of the aid bag.  This is considered our Trauma Kit and builds on splinting, bandaging, eye, dental, large wounds, burns.  Can be resupply or used as is.  It is based on several kits from past experience.  It may be hard to imagine but nearly every item in this kit could be expended on one incident.

Some of the kits from the past using the same bag had more of the bandaging and splinting materials.  Those kits had been based on, in part, by proximity to a military base and a direct flight path where helicopters and transport aircraft that could hold hundreds of soldiers could and sometimes did go down.

Then there is the, being the only one there and no one is coming. To the rural 20,000 person county, only 5 people qualified to operate two ambulances with the nearest mutual aid unit 30 minutes away, no air support.  Standing there after a mass casualty incident looking around and seeing empty aid bags and bandaging supply wrappers among the carnage leaves a lasting impression.

ALPHA

Alpha compartment, why we use those pouches

During the same time we were updating our kits we were able to find several different type packing organizers on sale at Marshalls store.  After using a few of them we went back to that store and many others within our local area and bought whatever stock they had in the store.

Those finds allowed us to keep items protected in ziploc bags and create mini kits without having a kit full of ziploc bag mess.  Multiples of one type item or a kit made of several different components they’ll work well for many common items.

LG ZIP POUCH

Double side bandaging pouch (Go Travel Packing Pouch no.3)

The bag above was one of the last pouches found.  As it’s packed it works very well, 8 rolls Kerlix, 12 5×9 Surgipads, 20 4×4 sponges.  I’ve looked for more and can’t find them.  The pouch below is what was used before we found the pouch above.  The dressings were packed the same way they are shown, the Kerlix was packed like the double side pouch, 8 rolls in a ziploc bag.

The smaller pouches have items like tape, self adhesive, triangle and elastic bandages.  The bandage pouches are very handy for bandaging purposes or resupply.  Glad we found them when we did.

SM ZIP POUCH

Single side bandaging pouch (Travelon Packing Organizers Set-Small)

CD CASE

CD Case

I’ve been looking at ways to store the instant hot and cold compresses for years.  When the portable CD cases became available I found out they worked well.  If the internal storage sleeves are removed there is room for two instant compresses.  All I had to do to get this type case to work was remove the sleeves from the rivets that were simple to pull out by hand.

At first I used a metal case but it added weight and was too stiff to fit in multiple spaces.  When these softer type plastic cases became available I tried one.  Discovered that I liked it better.  It has more flexibility and can fit into tighter spaces than the metal case.  For the type of compress and CD case chosen its simple to get them into the case.  First, I arrange the liquid part of the compress in one half of the bag and the dry ingredients in the other then, fold in half.

CASE FOLD

Case open showing how compress is packed

Place both compresses in the case then close it.  As shown below it works good.  The compress is protected from punctures and abrasion and it’s easy to see the contents.  I usually look for things like this at the outlet stores but ordered these off eBay for consistency.

CASE CLOSED

Case packed with 2 compresses

This kit has one 18″ and two 36″ SAM splints that can be used in many different ways and can be custom cut with the trauma shears.  Very handy to have on hand.  They beat the old ice cream scoop, vinyl covered wood, blow-up doll, waxed cardboard splints any day.

SPLINT

FareTec CT-6

REEL COMPACT

REEL Splint

The two photos above show the traction splints kept in or with the trauma kit.  The FareTec and the REEL splints are surplus finds.  If you’re looking to stock your kit check out eBay and the surplus stores.  Make sure all the parts are there before you buy, get new if at all possible.  Couldn’t give a price on either of these.  eBay as I shockingly found out only keeps auction records for 3 years not a running tally like Amazon.

EYE DENTURE

Dental / Eye Kit

In the photo above are the contents of the dental and eye kit.  The denture case can be used for dentures, loose teeth or prosthetic eyes.  There is a scleral cup for removing contacts and prosthetic eyes.  A case for contact lens and a 10x magnified mirror.

Two eye shields and two food service 16 ounce deli cups for covering injured eyes.  Those things can work well for keeping eyes protected.  Some of the eye injuries I’ve seen makes me want these in stock at all times.  Not shown are the sterile eye cups, the Sal-jet rinse 30ml saline vials or the Refresh Plus eye drops.

Most items in the kit have multiple uses.  Dressing like the trauma and surgipad make good splint padding.  The surgical CSR wraps in the kit to make clean working space can be used to protect wounds.  A mylar blanket as an occlusive dressing.  The list is endless.

SEAL

Security Sealed Kit

Security seals are an important part of our medical system.  The seals are tightly controlled and numbered.  A strict system is in place, only a couple of people here are allowed to seal a kit.  That way when one of the kits need to be used and the seal is intact we can be assured the contents will be there.

The seals used in the video are not the same seals used on our bags.  They’re from old stock and are used for training.  They work the same as fire extinguisher seals, twist or pull on the seal and it will break easily.  If you get some, get numbered if possible it will help in case someone else has the same type/color seals.

A word of caution, be careful where they are placed on zippers they can break zipper parts easy.

CASE OPEN

Hardigg AL3018-0905

The Trauma Kit is kept in a cabinet or could be stored and transported in a heavy duty case with the REEL splint, a MOLLE 2 pack frame, various color pack covers, a quick litter in a dump pouch and a small tarp to place the contents onto.  The case is stored with the gasket out, if left in place it compresses under the weight of the other cases and is not as effective over time.

Seems like that covers the items I felt I left out of the video.  I don’t want to repeat the video here.  I would rather people watch the video, then read the blog after to see what was left out.  Clearly I don’t write scripts for these videos, just an item name, maybe a note.  If there are any changes or updates in the future they’ll be posted.  The new video is below.  -13

 

Other video project featuring the Mega Medic bag are below.

Product review video.

 

 

 

Video of MOLLE 2 pack modifications.

 

 

Over-the-Counter Medications Kit

Note: this post contains affiliate links, proceeds support this website.

After setting up to make the Aid Bag video I realized it would be easy to make a quick video about the over-the-counter kit.  Been waiting to make it.  Thought it would be longer, the video is a short 3:50.  Could have made it much sooner.

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Hanging Toiletry Organizer/Over-the-counter meds kit

The kit is 14 3/4″ x 27″, has 9 zippered pockets, no issues.  It’s polyester on the outside and what looks like a cotton/polyester liner.  The hook at the top was changed to something that would work better for our intended use.  It its not heavy duty.  The quality is more for home items so it should hold up well for this purpose.  May be difficult to clean, all ointments once removed from original packaging usually get put into a vacuum or ziplock bag.

May add two more loops at the hook end toward the outer edge.  This could be used with other snap hooks or a metal bar to offer better support for long term hanging.  The organizer was purchased from the Container Store and was available before this was posted.

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Modified hook

When working emergency service calls I kept a small quantity of Tylenol, aspirin, Tums, Bag Balm, Chap Stick, Imodium, Benadryl, and wetting eye drops.  Could have been Murine.  That was my personal kit.  I learned the hard way that once you leave the station in a rescue, an engine or ambulance, if you do not have it with you in the boonies, no one is going to bring it to you.  Toilet paper, socks, water, food, anything essential.  In some of the areas, everyone showed up on scene and that was it.  No more help was coming.  We were it.

In station over the years a master kit with multiple selections was made.  Most of it had to do with personal preference or suggestion.  The selection of pain relievers came from personal experience with them.  Aspirin seems to work better than any of the others for my dental pains.  The others are for other body pains and rotation so I’m not using the same one consistently.

IvyX was added and never used.  No way to report on how well it works.  Several times the stock on hand will dry out and then has to be restocked.  The mensuration kit has pads and tampons, sometimes adults leave unprepared and youth experience puberty at  all times of the day or night.  Partially responsible for adult personnel health a good medic knows the importance of keeping a high quality supply of condoms.  People are people, nothing we can do to stop that, but we can help prevent other options if the product works.

The kit is kept easy to access in our homestead medical area along with all our first response equipment and is ready to go anywhere on a moments notice.  A short video is below.  -13

 

 

ALICE Magazine Pouch Turned MOLLE

From the Laboratory of Insane Schemes.  ALICE military surplus has been my load bearing choice since the mid 1970’s.  Not perfect for sure but it was a great place to carry my canteens and other items that would fit into ALICE 30 round magazine pouches.  Cut off the grenade pouch and they fit together nicely on an issue pistol belt.

Moving into the 2000’s.  After checking out some of the PALS / MOLLE surplus available I decided to change over.  Although the webbing can be hot and heavy the PALS way of attaching pouches or attachment of any kind to LBE or packs is a good one that almost makes the attached item a part of what it’s attached to.

Moving forward left unused canteen and ALICE magazine pouches packed in boxes and me wishing I had a better way than the adapters made to use ALICE on MOLLE.  The adapter still leaves the pouch flopping around like its on a pistol belt.  Not a very good solution.

I had the idea recently after a resupply to take apart an ALICE magazine pouch and see if I could convert it over to a MOLLE pouch.  If it would work it would fit perfectly on the space fillers on the DF-LCS rig elastic section I’d made from a zippered FLC purchased to salvage for parts.

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Inside view of FLC adapter/filler and “new” MOLLE magazine pouch attached.

First I had to figure out where the attachment straps would be placed near the top of the pouch and where to snap it on.  At the top I chose the hinge point for the lid so it wouldn’t interfere with access.  Snaps on the bottom.  When the snaps are on the back of the pouch they tend to push it out due to the bulk of the snap.  If snap popping becomes an issue they can always be changed to lift-the-DOT.  We’ll see what happens in the future.

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Finished pouch.

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Location of snaps

The web straps were the same length.   Doubled, folded in half and sewn together.  Measuring the magazine pouches for the PALS webbing I discovered that the pouch width could vary as much as a 1/4″ between 4 pouches.  I chose the widest width and cut all the pieces that size.  There are no actual dimensions in here because the variation in pouch width, measuring devices and points of measurement may not be the same as mine.  Duplicating it exactly may cause problems.

After lots of seam ripping and thread picking the pouch was in half and the ALICE webbing was removed.  Laying out the PALS is as simple as can be 1″ x 1 1/2″.  Since the pouch is so small I sewed a center line and the edges like I’ve seen on some issue pouches.  Sew the straps to the hinge point.  Keep it simple.

Although the snaps used and the Pres-n-Snap are designed to cut through the fabric without punching a hole, I did punch because the amount of pouches were small and I wanted more precise location of my snaps.  I’ve had puckering and slight movement of the snap post under pressure from the hand press that the finished snap was visibly off mark times I haven’t punched a hole first.  It’s also much easier on the body with a hand press if the hole has been punched.

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With the holes punched and the webbing sewn on, the stud part of the snap was installed on the bottom of the pouches.  I try to leave them until the end of the project or leave them off for as long as possible.  In the past I’ve put them on early thinking I’m saving time but they were in the way of the sewing machine on many occasions or were scratched up.

Once the snap half was in place the pouches could be sewn back together again.  The top and bottom received four stitch lines and the whole side of the pouch received two stitch lines.  That complete, the other half of the snaps were installed on the web straps and that was it.  Those are the steps I took to convert ALICE to MOLLE.  Now I have some of my favorite pouches to use again.  There’s a video below of the process.  -13

Materials used: Mil Spec DOT snaps, poly webbing, sunbrella thread.

Austere Medicine: Mega Medic Bag / MOLLE 2 Pack Frame Attachment Points

The first video I made on this bag.

 

The Dyna-Med Mega Medic bag is one of my favorite bags to use.  Only problem is when I pack the bag it gets heavy.  Sometimes 35+ pounds.  I need a better way to move the bag than hand or over shoulder carry with that kind of weight.

I have a broken MOLLE 2 pack frame I like to use for experiments so I don’t break a good one.  By chance I laid the frame next to the mega medic bag setting on a table one day.  It was easy to notice how close they were in size so I set the bag on top of the frame and this is the result.

A video how I modified the mega medic bag to attach to the MOLLE 2 pack frame.  It’s not a how-to, it’s a how I did it video.  The process was simple but time consuming.

Put the bag on the frame, pick the best spots to attach webbing.  Mark it, get the dimensions for the webbing, mark, then cut the pieces.  That process took maybe 45 minutes to an hour.  Once the webbing is ready its sewing time.

I knew sewing was going to go slow.  The pieces I’ve added would have been sewn on much sooner in the assembly process reducing the time drastically.  The time was no problem since quality/accuracy is more important to me than speed.  The webbing straps make it easy to attach to the MOLLE 2 frame.  Think this took more like an hour plus but I’m not sure.

I did notice over the last few videos how bad the audio is so I’ll attempt to make it better. Several issues there that must be addressed.  After I’ve updated the kit contents I’ll make another video about the bag to include kit content and modifications. -13

Video of modifications.

Video Projects: Correcting my mistakes: MOLLE 2 Pack Belt

Correcting my mistakes.  That is what I made this video about.  While recently dyeing a surplus MOLLE 2 pack belt to check the progress and color of it was placed in the sink.  My thought was run cold water over it to cool it so it could be easier to handle.  That turns out was the wrong thing to do.

When the belt was taken out of the dye bath it was in it’s original shape and retained the cushioning properties.  After the belt was placed in the sink, the cold water was turned on.  The moment the cold water hit the molded foam part of the belt it collapsed in an instant.  I was watching when it happened.  It looked like a vacuum sucked all the air out of it.

Total disbelief and amazement.  I stood there and stared at it for a moment because of the shock.  After that?  Time to fix it.

The materials were on hand to make the belt useable again.  Closed cell foam that won’t absorb liquids and 1000D Cordura to cover it with binding on the edges with military spec DOT brand snaps.  At first I thought that I could  cover a single piece of foam, attach it and I’m on my way.  That was not going to work because of the geometry.  I decided to make the pads in three pieces attached by snaps.  Both item I can repair or remake in my shop.

The video was made over a year ago so the first microphone I was using will sound much different than the microphone I used to do the voiceover.  The difference will be noticeable.  Nearly all of the video and many others from that time frame had music playing in the background that would for sure get a copyright claim on YouTube.

Lessons learned, turn the music down when I’m speaking/recording so I can save myself the hassle of fixing it later.  And, don’t run that molded foam under cold water when removing it from the hot dye bath! -13

Here’s the repair video.

Video Projects: Like a hot knife. Video satisfaction?

Come one, come all!  See what happens when I cut webbing with a rope cutter!  Sound like clickbait?  I think so too. So, thought I’d make this video because it seems some people like this kind of content.  This comes from another video project I’m working on at present.  Going to post it to the YT and see what happens. -13

 

iDye Poly Experiment: Military Surplus

After seeing videos on YouTube and having my own experience with dying military surplus thought I’d make a video about it.  iDye Poly Kelly was used for this experiment if you’re looking for a source.  Hope this helps others decide to dye or not. -13

Dash Cam: Special 3 Squirrels, Birds and French Fries

Irma passed.  The electricity and internet stayed on the entire time.  Then as the storm passed, internet gone!  For more than a week, I’ll write more on that in another post.  Couldn’t work on my other projects so thought I’d clear up some of my video projects and catch up.

Here it is weeks later and just today have I been able to accomplish what I set out to do.  What I thought would take a week has turned into three weeks.  I discovered I had four months of dash cam videos piled up on my computer.  When I checked, the memory on the computer was in the red zone.  Whatever that meant.

Parked at the computer desk I began the sorting process.  I discovered some things I hadn’t noticed before when I didn’t have so many to sort at the same time.  Our dK2 camera usually records 100, three minute videos per day, often more.  There are so many drivers not using their turn signal to indicate a lane change I had to eliminate all but the most offensive in my eye.  I used close calls, speed, proximity to others, distance etc as a guide.  The progression of this can be seen in the videos as I learned more.

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It takes me about 30 seconds to scan each 3 minute section.  More if I find something.  Every 5 hours or so of video seems to produce 1-2 minutes of useable footage.  The project getting behind like that was to much.  I have to stay on top of it or it will become overwhelming and I’ll run out of storage space.

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I finally figured a way to cut a still image from the actual footage to use as a custom thumbnail.  That discovery made me want to go back an change all the covers to the begining.  I didn’t like the blue screen background much it reminded me of computer blue screen hell.  So, now it’s changed.

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I also have a lot of after hurricane Irma footage to work on.  Hoping I can find some before footage to work in for contrast.  That will take a couple weeks again of trying to find, then match footage or stills.  I’ve deleted many things that are gone forever so it might be hard to find.  Lesson learned with imovie, save a copy away from your project, if you cut something from another project then delete it, it will be gone from your other project.

Glad I’m somewhat caught up.  The Irma after footage will be time consuming but worth it because there is serious destruction recorded on them.  They look like they will be much longer than most videos.  More in the 10 minute ranges or so.  I like making these kind of videos for fun hope people enjoy them. -13