Dash Cam: July so far, catching up

Dash Cam 85-87 and another Special Aircraft.  Getting closer to catching up posting all the footage two cameras can capture.  Trying an experiment with the video title format.  From now going forward I’ll title the videos “Florida You Need A Dash Cam L-” with the number of the video following the “L-“.  It’s an experiment to see if the videos will get more views or attract more subscribers.  It will be interesting to see what happens.

 

Lesson 85, What happens when a driver puts a drink on top of car?  Scooter and motorcycle in the middle and everywhere.  Plenty of cut offs and no signal lane changes.  Short ride through the Henry E. Kinney Tunnel.  A couple of merge close calls.

 

 

Lesson 86, Features the I-95 North exit from 836 East where drivers like to drive past all the other drivers waiting their turn to get to 95 and cut line.  They can be seen in the rearview mirror either getting out line to drive ahead or simply skip that and try to cut in line.  As a rule we cut them off and won’t let them in.  Some drivers can’t be made to wait for anyone this video is full of it wait until you see van driver.  A cool jet crossing.  dK2 where am I confusion.  Jump ramp tow truck?  A drawbridge break part of coastal living.

 

 

Lesson 87, Starts with a diver that cuts through the median to get past other traffic who then gets rear ended.  Motorcycles in the middle stunt drivers.  A scooter driver on the phone.  Typical late use of turn signal.  Quick trip from Fisher Island to Terminal Island.  Peacock crossing.  Building art.  Park there you’ll get a ticket.  Driving along, light traffic, no zombies in sight, almost there you realize, wrong exit!

 

 

Special 7 is all about aircraft crossings.  It’s surprising how much of this kind of footage gets recorded.  We had pilots in our family so I like this type of footage.  It seems like some of it is really a once in a lifetime chance to capture.  Like in 74 the jet is captured through the bridge with a nice flyover.  The Goodyear Blimp, dam those cobra cameras!  My favorite in this one might be the bird in 85.  Hope you enjoy.

 

Worm bin notes: More trash than you can eat? Call friends!

Update 9 for bins 2 & 3.

1JUL2018- Bin 2 & 3, moving worms from bin 3 over to 2.  There is a noticeable difference in consumption between the bins.  Both bins have an odor from the mangos.  The smell is only noticeable when removing the cardboard layer and expected at this point in the process.  Surprising how there is no smell only feet away.

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Bin 3 1JUL2018

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Bin 2 1JUL2018

There was a buildup of moisture on the lid and cardboard in 3.  Looked like it was about to rain.  The amount of worms were not as visible as I thought they might be so I only scooped up a few handfuls to move over to bin 2.  See how this affects the bins before moving more.  They’re usually more concentrated making it easier to move with less casting loss from the donor bin.

This time the food was evenly distributed and it seems so were the worms.  In the past they did not receive as much as once so they gathered in more concentrated groups.  Easy pickings when it’s time to move them.  They’re in bin 2 now so lets see what happens next.

8JUL2018- Bins 2 & 3, clearly the addition of worms from bin 3 over to 2 made a big difference.  The before and after shown in the video is amazing to see and demonstrates why it was a necessity.  When opening the bins there was no foul odors and it looks like I’m keeping the roaches out.

Forgot for refill my water sprayer before I started so none of the bins were sprayed this time.  I’ll give them a spray Monday or Tuesday they won’t need much.  Bin 2 didn’t look like I’d added anything except that all the excess was leveled.  Bin 3 had the low spots created when removing worms on JUL1 that will slowly even back out.  By the next time they’ll be close to unnoticeable. It is another interesting thing to see happen in these bins.

Wasn’t much to do but add more waste and let both bins equalize with all the changes.  I have to get better at taking stills for all the reasons I use them.  When I don’t it bites me in the ass every time, that and the autofocus. Check out the video below for some good close ups of the worm transfer.  -13

Worm bin notes: One meal at a time

Update 7, Bin 1, One meal at a time and lots of poop is how it will be built. Watching this process if fascinating.  Waste in, waste out, soil.  No foul odors or unwanted insects.  Looks like the population is growing.  There were plenty of the roly-polys and a few worms visible.  Didn’t want to disturb much so they will settle in.  When they’re hard to see like that they are usually directly under a food source.  Rather leave them be so they can flourish.

I’ll wait another few weeks or so before digging around in there to see how the worms are doing.  Next time I film these bins I’ll try some different views for a closer look inside the bins.  Check out the state of bin 1 in the video below.

Dash Cam: June projects & Special 8

June was a busy month for the dash cam project.  Lots of videos released plus a special.  Thank you to everyone who takes the time to watch our driving adventures.  Special 8 features a drive from Ft. Lauderdale to Miami on I-95 south.  Not sure anyone will be interested in watching it but thought it would be cool to have a record of what the drive was like at a particular time in history.  Enjoy the dash cam madness!  -13

 

Lesson 75 is mostly about a freight train with some traffic.  The Goodyear Blimp, see why the Cobra cams had to go.  Imagine if the footage of the blimp had it been working.  Then before the train we get one confused driver.

 

Lesson 76 is a typical day with confused drivers, a busy scene at the drawbridge and a jet fly-by.

 

 

Lesson 77 has zombies on the street, cut offs, no signal lane changers and a truck with a cord hanging off the trailer.

 

Lesson 78 Cut offs, police action, motorcycle in the middle, jet fly-by, confusion and a red light runner.

 

Lesson 79 has something for the art fans, moonlit nights, pylon strikes, bicycle crazy, cut offs, no signal lane changers, a fantastic scene where a jet flies directly in front of the camera you don’t want to miss it, another motorcycle in the middle.

 

Lesson 80 has some drawbridge action, an incredible scene with a dragonfly emerging out of nowhere, getting caught in a wind current disappearing then coming back again, it is another you don’t want to miss it.  Art, motorcycles in the middle, zombies learning to park another typical drive in south Florida.

 

Lesson 81 has the typical cut offs and plenty of confusion.  Drivers doing stupid stuff.

 

Lesson 82 has jet action, a duck crossing, merge-exit madness. Henry E. Kinney Tunnel north bound drive through.  Late comers, night time bicycle surprise and more.

 

Lesson 83 rainy night pedestrian surprise, jet fly-over at night two of them, baby attempts to run into street, more no signal cut offs, confusion.  A semi-truck showing how its done when you need to make that turn.  FSU bridge under construction and motorcycle in the middle you won’t want to miss this one.

 

Lesson 84 is the last lesson released in June.  It features a little art, something for the public rail fans, a death defying lane change, classic cut offs, accident scenes.  Someone changing a tire on I-95 south partially on the roadway and no Road Ranger to block traffic.  Find out if balls really do fly onto the road and confused drivers who are totally clueless.

 

 

Special 8 is a drive from Fort Lauderdale to Miami via I-95 south.  It starts entering I-95 south in Fort Lauderdale and ends in Miami on I-95.  There is a moment when a truck changes lanes we thought for sure was going all the way.

Worm bin notes: Undisturbed they settle in

Update 6, bin 1.  This update starts with a seedling mango tree trying to compete for food with the worms getting put in its place.  Then, not much.  No foul odors or unwanted insects.  All left undisturbed so they can settle in and start building without interruption.

Added new waste to shallow end to see how long it takes to build up to the other higher level.  This is my favorite bin at this point due to the nature of the experiment.  Unknown worms and other insects from an unknown source plus the roly-poly stray adoption along the way.  From the smallest worm find until now it keeps getting more interesting as they increase in size and population. -13

Short video below check it out.

Worm bin notes: Give them enough time

Update 8 for bins 2 & 3.  Bin 2.  Need to add more worms and will within days.  No foul odors looking good.  Insect populations flourishing.  No roaches visible.

Bin 3 is in the same state as bin 2.  There is more waste consumed validating my need to move more worm into bin 2.  The good news is there is not much to note. -13

Video of Bin 2  & 3 progress.

Dash Cam: Death of the COBRA CDR 840

Death of the Cobra CDR 840 video is online.  The dash cam project started out of necessity.  We have a high incidence of hit-and-run accidents here in the Miami-Dade and Broward county areas.  FHP numbers for 2017, Broward 11,856 Miami-Dade 19,285.  Those are only the hit-and-run numbers for one year.  Hard to wrap around those number huh?  After it happened to me several years ago.  Wish I’d would have had a camera that day!  Lesson learned!

Today, will not drive any form of transportation without a dash cam.  A look at any video posted since this project was started will demonstrate why.  More validation in my mind was how fast the insurance company paid dK2 when they found out that their driver had received citations and dK2 could produce dash camera footage.  They couldn’t write the check fast enough.

The Cobra CDR 840 showed up at Costco sometime either late 2016 or early 2017.  One was purchased for image quality testing.  The camera was used for about a month before deciding to purchase two more.  They were installed in all the vehicles we use.  At first the plan was to delete the footage unless there was an accident involvement.

That changed after a long weekend of viewing several hours of footage.  Watching drivers doing some of the most stupid and dangerous maneuvers a driver could do.  After discovered editing software the dash cam project was born to document the crazy drivers.

That is not what this video is about. The video contains several clips featuring different malfunctions of the camera.  The first scene is from another camera malfunctioning on what I thought would have been really cool.   The Goodyear Blimp floating across the sky would have been awesome to me.  Then it moves through the different malfunctions.  Get ready to enter the Matrix!

After entering the matrix do not adjust your video settings because everything you see is the camera not your video player or computer.  The video ends with an opinion offered as too why we will never use a camera powered like it again.

All cameras worked well at the beginning then all slowly progressed downhill the same way.  Lack of longevity and the power cord did this camera style in for good.  No more cameras with a power cord like the one on the Cobra camera.  New cameras are in operation and collecting hours and hours of footage.  As soon as there is enough footage to  put together a video about the new cameras one will be made.  Check out the video before you buy your next dash camera. -13

 

Austere Medicine: Mega Medic Bag / MOLLE 2 Pack Frame Attachment Points

The first video I made on this bag.

 

The Dyna-Med Mega Medic bag is one of my favorite bags to use.  Only problem is when I pack the bag it gets heavy.  Sometimes 35+ pounds.  I need a better way to move the bag than hand or over shoulder carry with that kind of weight.

I have a broken MOLLE 2 pack frame I like to use for experiments so I don’t break a good one.  By chance I laid the frame next to the mega medic bag setting on a table one day.  It was easy to notice how close they were in size so I set the bag on top of the frame and this is the result.

A video how I modified the mega medic bag to attach to the MOLLE 2 pack frame.  It’s not a how-to, it’s a how I did it video.  The process was simple but time consuming.

Put the bag on the frame, pick the best spots to attach webbing.  Mark it, get the dimensions for the webbing, mark, then cut the pieces.  That process took maybe 45 minutes to an hour.  Once the webbing is ready its sewing time.

I knew sewing was going to go slow.  The pieces I’ve added would have been sewn on much sooner in the assembly process reducing the time drastically.  The time was no problem since quality/accuracy is more important to me than speed.  The webbing straps make it easy to attach to the MOLLE 2 frame.  Think this took more like an hour plus but I’m not sure.

I did notice over the last few videos how bad the audio is so I’ll attempt to make it better. Several issues there that must be addressed.  After I’ve updated the kit contents I’ll make another video about the bag to include kit content and modifications. -13

Video of modifications.

Worm bin notes: Death of a roach

Update 7 for bins 2 & 3.  Bin 2 is looking good.  No foul odors.  Looks like there is a notable amount of waste left in here than in bin 3.  This is indicating I need to move more worms from bin 3 over.  The difference is clear to see.  Moisture level seems good.  I’ll need to add more cardboard soon.  Better add some sand next feed time.

Bin 3 is working like a well oiled machine.  It’s unimaginable how much they can change the landscape inside the bin.  Somehow they move half a mango to make it look like it’s sinking into the soil.  Totally amazed by that.  Seems like there are more of the white dot and skinny bugs in bin 2 than in this bin.  Maybe they’re subsoil when the waste gets that low.  I can see them move in and out of the soil when I watch them.  Mostly I see them on top.  No foul odors.

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Last post I mentioned roaches.  Thought it was going to be a big hassle to find it.  Wow was I wrong.  As I was moving the cardboard out of the bin the roach ended up in my hand.  At first I didn’t know it was there because it was in the gloved hand.  I then noticed something kind of squishy.  Thinking it was a small pile of worm bunched up I quickly looked where my fingers sensing the difference.

It was the roach, or a new one.  I was in disbelieve it was that easy.  Couldn’t have planned that in a million years.  Once I realized my luck I threw it on the floor and killed it.  The cats sitting there supervising me.  Hope that was all of them.  -13

Video Update 7 Below

Worm bin notes: They aren’t alone

Update 5, bin 1.  Amazing progress.  There are worms everywhere in that bin.  I thought they would be concentrated in the thicker soil under all the food waste I’ve been feeding.   What a surprise to find then in numbers under the decaying grass introduced last week.  They all look healthy.  The roly poly are also doing well I could see many smaller ones running around in there indicating reproduction.  They might overrun the bin.  If they do I let them loose on my yard compost pile.  It is an experiment.

When I lifted part of a mango I found another unidentified insect alongside the worms.  Was able to get a close up on video.  It looked like something I’ve seen when pulling bark off a rotting tree.  Maybe I’ll be able to figure out what it is.  Guessing it was in the soil that the worms were in when I introduced them to the bin.

Can’t remember if I was going to start putting waste on the thinner soil side this soon.  After seeing the number of worms under the grass I will.  Start building it up.  Couldn’t be more fascinated by this bin and it’s progression.   The distribution and number of worms, rapidly reproducing roly polys and a new species.  Added strawberries, sprayed a good rain to keep the moisture up seemed a little dry in there.  The hard part at this point is knowing how much waste to put in without creating a stinking mess.  Don’t want to over do it.  -13

Video Update 5 Below

Vacuum Sealer Project: FIRESTARTER

The simple vacuum sealer. One of my favorite appliances made for home use. I’ve always wanted to have the ability to vacuum package my own stuff since I opened one in the 70’s.  It might be survival supplies, clothing I want to stay dry and compact, or something good to eat.  Around here seems like the sealer gets used for non-food items as much as repackaged food or snacks.

Sometime in 2016 I started to update our fire starting kits.  In the past my fire starting kit included military surplus matches/trioxane fuel bars/toilet paper packet, flint/steel/char-cloth/extra cloth/in a tin, Bic brand lighter, a Doan Magnesium Firestarter, pine heart wood, magnifying glass, and wildcrafted tender that was constantly in need of replacement.

I always use the lighter first.  All the rest of it backup or an aid when the flames needed a little help.  The updated kit for everyday fire starting is very small, natural fibre tender, lighter and WetFire if the fire needs help.

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The survival fire starting kit has more options based on the many fire starting failures and successes I’ve experienced over the years.  I know what does and does not work for me.  There is nothing like suffering as a motivator.  If at all possible I won’t do without a heat source.

The updated kit is set up to be self contained within an individual survival kit or pack.  All of the items within the kit are vacuum sealed individually.  Each vacuum package is over size to allow the package to be reused after opening.  The length is long enough to allow the end to be rolled up then held closed with a rubber band included in each package.

Not sure if this would work I tested to see if this would be enough to keep out rain or a dunk in water.  Part of a paper towel was placed into the package.  The torn edge was rolled then held in place with a rubber band.  The sprayer on the sink set to high, water blasted on the package from every angle for a minute or so with no leak.

A similar test was set up for dunking.  The same package used to test before was used for this test, nothing was changed on the package at all.  The package was held underwater in a drywall compound bucket for about thirty seconds to a minute.  I held it down by hand and moved it gently in the water to simulate a quick immersion in a body of water. Thinking as if this was in my pocket and I fell into water somehow and was able to get out quickly.  Again, the result, dry.

Wouldn’t it be great if I’d filmed it.  But no! It was an after thought.  Not so much as a photograph.  Getting used to that now.  Better off doing your own testing for sure.  The packing material rolled tightly along with the compression of the rubber band worked much better than I expected.

The contents are mostly modern.  I’ve eliminated the old time flint-steel and military surplus trioxane/matches/T.P.  The kits may still contain military surplus like a Doan’s firestarter  or folding knife since those seem to last forever.

Added UCO matches to the standard book matches and Bic lighter.  Anyone who has not seen the testing done on the UCO matches should see it then make up their own mind.  If it gets down to lighting a fire with matches I think those are my best chance of getting it lit.  They are the only match I know of that will still be lit if I manage to drop it in water.

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Various types of tender.  A tin of pine heart wood with a high pitch content, cedar and hardwood shavings, alcohol prep pads and WetFire cubes.  Magnifying glass and fresnel lens.  Swedish Fire steel purchased on sale with either a Camillus military stainless four blade folder or a Victorinox Pioneer knife.

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All of it packaged in a waterproof vacuum sealed pouch made at home.  It measures roughly 5 1/2″ x 8″, 1lb 3oz or 540g. The kit will never be a problem to keep on hand.  The last addition to the kit was a by accident item.

A friend came back from a professional convention and handed me several nylon carry bags.  I looked at them, they had cord configured into a backpack.  Didn’t think much of the flimsy things so I set them aside.  About an hour later a thought smacked me in the head like a hammer.

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I grabbed one, folded it a few times, it fit the fire starting kit profile.  Like it was planned that way.  The thought that hit me was how useful the bag would be in gathering all the small stuff needed to start a fire that is difficult to transport without loosing valuable resources.  The thinking was what if the fire starting kit was the only survival item I had on my person a way to carry things would be very helpful.

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Sure the bag is made of imported nylon and cordage.  The thing is, all it has to do is work well once for a short period of time.  If the bag is not overloaded I have confidence it will hold lightweight items for a few days until help arrived or conditions changed.  The already made kit and the bag were added to another vacuum pouch then sealed.  That way the bag can be retrieved without having to open the fire starting kit if its not needed.

Don’t forget the tear notch!  Must have the tear notch no matter what your preference!

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Tear notch samples

This video was filmed in early 2017 after getting all the items together.  I noticed after making the package in the video I had left the knife out.  That’s what I get for not making a checklist.  It was not filmed but the knife was added as soon as I moved some of the stuff visible to the right in the video.  The knife was covered by some it.

This is a kit I never want the need to use it.  Because if I do need to use it, it means something has gone wrong. -13

The video.

Video Projects: Correcting my mistakes: MOLLE 2 Pack Belt

Correcting my mistakes.  That is what I made this video about.  While recently dyeing a surplus MOLLE 2 pack belt to check the progress and color of it was placed in the sink.  My thought was run cold water over it to cool it so it could be easier to handle.  That turns out was the wrong thing to do.

When the belt was taken out of the dye bath it was in it’s original shape and retained the cushioning properties.  After the belt was placed in the sink, the cold water was turned on.  The moment the cold water hit the molded foam part of the belt it collapsed in an instant.  I was watching when it happened.  It looked like a vacuum sucked all the air out of it.

Total disbelief and amazement.  I stood there and stared at it for a moment because of the shock.  After that?  Time to fix it.

The materials were on hand to make the belt useable again.  Closed cell foam that won’t absorb liquids and 1000D Cordura to cover it with binding on the edges with military spec DOT brand snaps.  At first I thought that I could  cover a single piece of foam, attach it and I’m on my way.  That was not going to work because of the geometry.  I decided to make the pads in three pieces attached by snaps.  Both item I can repair or remake in my shop.

The video was made over a year ago so the first microphone I was using will sound much different than the microphone I used to do the voiceover.  The difference will be noticeable.  Nearly all of the video and many others from that time frame had music playing in the background that would for sure get a copyright claim on YouTube.

Lessons learned, turn the music down when I’m speaking/recording so I can save myself the hassle of fixing it later.  And, don’t run that molded foam under cold water when removing it from the hot dye bath! -13

Here’s the repair video.